Table of Contents

This isn’t a table of contents in the traditional sense. Rather, it’s a list of topics I wish to explore on this website. It’s meant to hold me accountable and remind myself why I’m doing this in the first place.

It’s a living list and will evolve over time.

  1. The science behind the creative potential of doing nothing/being bored.
  2. Explore the concept of the Flaneur and ‘Walk-Abouts’.
  3. Trying new and weird things. Getting outside of your comfort zone.
  4. Day dreaming and why being called a day dreamer is a compliment.
  5. The No Plan Zone. Feeling over-scheduled gives me hives.
  6. Perception of John Berger’s Ways of Seeing.
  7. Getting lost in Rothko.

Image Source: Tumblr

The Art & Science of Being Bored

CelebratedSizzlingBoaconstrictor

The idea of doing nothing and the premise of this website, like all good things, is supported by research. But first, join me while I go down memory lane to the true inspiration for my website, my childhood.

I grew up during the 90s, a magical time without social media, limited internet, no cable (I now thank my parents for this), and a backyard that consisted of 40 acres of fields and woods. Weekends would roll around and I would inevitably moan to my parents: “I’m booooooored.” Rolling around on the ground like a piece of wet spaghetti.

Every kid says this or at least they did when I was growing up. But unlike other kids, I didn’t have MTV to turn to. My parents would always say: “Go outside and use your imagination.” *eye role* What a cop out. They are just trying to get rid of me.

Wow, was I ever wrong.

The ‘bored’ times I spent wandering in the woods is what made me who I am today.  Hours spent exploring every inch of those 40 acres without a plan, without friends, set my imagination on fire.

A fallen over tree with termite holes became a ladder and a lookout for what would become a made up classroom. Luckily for me a school shut down at the end of our street and I scored an old desk. It’s still there to this day.

An empty fox or coyote hole filled with me fear (where are they?) but also led me to imagine those woods as a Beatrix Potter-esque world.

I could go on. Point is, the ideas and fantasies I made up were endless and emerged because my mind was clear and I was incredibly bored.  This is what the Italians call La Dolce Far Niente or the sweetness of doing nothing. Not a new concept, just rarely practiced or celebrated.

I’m on a mission to change that.

Image Source: Sadly, cannot remember.

Lightmapping…

A special light painting tool displays radiation levels in real-time at the gates of a ruined church in Starye Bobovichi, Russia.  Here white light shows contamination levels up to 0.23uSv/h, while orange highlights elevated levels – from 0.50uSv/h to 0.85uSv/h around the gates.  30 years after the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear disaster, the schoolyard still contains areas of elevated radiation levels.
A special light painting tool displays radiation levels in real-time at the gates of a ruined church in Starye Bobovichi, Russia.
Here white light shows contamination levels up to 0.23uSv/h, while orange highlights elevated levels – from 0.50uSv/h to 0.85uSv/h around the gates.
30 years after the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear disaster, the schoolyard still contains areas of elevated radiation levels.

This is incredibly useful and absolutely stunning…

Photographer Greg McNevin overlaid measurement graphs on images to visualize the amount of radioactivity in Chernobyl.

This is a perfect example of the power of data visualization. It makes complex things visible. This has so many uses for other parts of the world and situations (gas leaks).

Can’t wait to see what he does next.

 

i’ve always been a fan of minimalism…

In fact it was in all of my 20th century art history classes that I had the highest marks. For some reason the theories resonated with me and I felt a certain amount of compassion towards the artists of the 60s. Specifically the minimalist artists in New York at this time.

The fact that these artists embraced the art object (approaching it in different ways) avoiding convoluted messages, made their works even more powerful then a famous Neo-Classical painting. Less is certainly more.

High Fives to the following heroes of Minimalism.

Donald Judd

This work is ‘Untitled’ like many of Judd’s creations. He felt naming works of art took away from the object itself. The focus must always be on the art object and its space.

Frank Stella

This incredible painter focused on the actual shape of the canvas while also giving color shape. Generally, he avoided meaning in his works because it was believed that for centuries meaning had been used to deceive. Minimalism was about getting back to basics.

Robert Morris

This artist created some of the most compelling sculptures during the 60s and was one of the big players of Minimalism. Fascinated, like the others, with the art object but also with the art space, he believed a work acquired its meaning when viewed. His ‘L Beams’ sculpture took up most of the gallery space,  challenging not only how we view art but also how we experience art.

These artists rule because they kick started the Conceptual movement. There are many different ways to communicate ideas, and the artists of the 60s prove that!